Is Your Leg Pain Being Caused By Shin Splints?

Pain in your shin or the front of your lower leg can be challenging, especially when it affects your ability to perform everyday tasks like running and walking. But where is your shin pain originating? Today Dr. Hubert Lee of CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists is sharing what you need to know about this sometimes-baffling condition.

What Are Shin Splints?

Shin splints can be a painful condition that restricts your ability to run or walk. The ailment, which is marked by dull or sharp, aching pains in the front of your shins, often seems to appear for no apparent reason and without warning.

While there are things you can do to deal with the problem, it’s a good idea to talk with your podiatrist to thoroughly analyze your condition and determine the right course of treatment.

Could Something Else Be Causing Your Shin Pain?

In some cases, shin splints are not the source of your leg pain, so it is important to visit your podiatrist to ensure you get the proper diagnosis and treatment. Here are some other conditions that may be at the root of your pain.

  • Tibial stress fractures occur when you overstrain your shin bones and don’t allow enough recovery time.
  • Sciatica is a painful condition that originates in your lower back and causes irritation of your sciatic nerve.
  • Compartment Syndrome is a pain in your lower leg that happens when blood fills the muscles of your leg faster than it can escape.
  • Blood Clots in your lower leg usually cause calf pain, but in some rare cases, the symptoms may be felt in your shin.
  • Osteosarcoma or Tumor can be a cause of shin pain.
  • Posterior Tibialis Tendonitis is pain located behind your shin that can become irritated.

Diagnosing Shin Pain

If you are experiencing shin pain, your podiatrist may order diagnostic tests to determine the cause. These tests may include:

  • X-ray to rule out a stress fracture in your shin bone;
  • EMG testing to check on how your leg’s nerves are functioning;
  • MRI tests to view the soft tissue around your lower extremities;
  • Ultrasound to check the lower part of your leg for blood clots;
  • Physical exams that include palpation, range of motion tests, and strength testing.

If you begin experiencing pain in the front part of your lower leg that worsens while walking or running, you may have shin splints. But there may be other causes, so visit your podiatrist when leg pain strikes.

Once an accurate diagnosis is determined, proper treatment can be started, putting you on the road to a quick recovery. So don’t hesitate, call the office of Dr. Hubert Lee of CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists today to schedule a consultation so we can determine what’s causing your shin pain.

Athlete’s Foot: 12 Myths and Facts

Smothered inside socks and shoes all day, feet can become sweaty, stinky, and the perfect carriers for all sorts of germs that can cause a red, itchy condition called athlete’s foot. Today our podiatrist, Dr. Hubert Lee of CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists is sharing what you need to know about this contagious condition.

Read on to learn more about these common myths

Myth 1: Only athletes can get athlete’s foot. Athlete’s foot earned its name because the fungus that causes it typically hangs out in places that athletes frequent, like locker rooms and showers, not because it’s limited to athletes.

Myth 2: Athlete’s foot is different from jock itch. While jock itch and athlete’s foot are caused by the same fungus, the conditions are named by the part of the body where they occur.

Myth 3: Athlete’s foot can be prevented by regularly showering. Showering alone won’t clear up the fungus that causes athlete’s foot but keeping them clean and dry can help prevent this fungus from coming back.

Myth 4: Only people with poor hygiene habits get athlete’s foot. You can wash your feet several times a day with soap and water and still get athlete’s foot. This is especially true if you don’t dry your feet fully after each washing.

Myth 5: You can only get athlete’s foot if you walk barefoot in areas where the fungus is living. You can get it if you share socks, shoes or towels with someone who has athlete’s foot.

Myth 6: With athlete’s foot, there’s always peeling between the toes. This condition can look different in each person. Some people experience cracking or peeling skin between their toes while others suffer from dryness or redness on the bottom of their feet.

Myth 7: Athlete’s foot only affects the feet. Athlete’s foot can extend to other places if you scratch the area and then touch other parts of your body or through contaminated sheets or clothing.

Myth 8: If you wear shoes and socks all day you can’t get athlete’s foot.  Wet socks and shoes are the perfect environments for this fungus. Your feet are safe, as long as you keep them dry.

Myth 9: Athlete’s foot will heal on its own. Without treatment, your feet we become even itchier and result in a more serious infection. Antifungal creams and pills are the best treatment options.

Myth 10: You can stop treatment as soon as your symptoms are gone. To stop athlete’s foot from returning, continue using the medicine for as long as recommended.

Myth 11: Once you treat athlete’s foot, it won’t return. Even after treatment, athlete’s foot can return if you neglect to take steps to prevent its return.

Myth 12: You can’t get athlete’s foot if you wear cotton socks. The opposite is true. Synthetic fiber socks are the best option due to their better absorption of moisture.

Wondering if your itchy feet are being caused by athlete’s foot? Don’t hesitate – call the office of Dr. Hubert Lee of CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists today to schedule a consultation to determine if your condition is being caused by athlete’s foot and to discuss options for treatment.

Tips for Avoiding Common Foot Problems in the Elderly

As we get older, many people begin to think more about their overall health, but often forget about their feet. But the truth is that if your feet aren’t healthy, you can find yourself housebound, immobile or even worse. Today Dr. Hubert Lee of CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists is explaining why foot care for the elderly should be a priority.

Common Foot Problems Experienced by Seniors

Conditions that range from bunions to hammertoes and even problems due to diabetes can become more common as we age.

Some of the most common issues include:

 

These conditions can affect mobility, and when combined with other agility issues, they can render you immobile for extended periods. You may even find yourself in a wheelchair or on a scooter.

Foot Care for Seniors

Foot problems in seniors can occur in any part of the foot. As a person ages, it can become more challenging for them to maintain their foot health, and as their caregiver, you may need to step in and help.

If you notice yellowing, or they complain about a burning sensation in their feet, you should make an appointment with your podiatrist to make sure these are not complications from diabetes or other serious conditions.

After you’ve determined there are no serious issues, use this checklist to avoid elderly foot problems:

  • Elevate their feet while seated using a footstool;
  • Always dry feet thoroughly;
  • Wear properly-fitting shoes and socks;
  • Keep toenails trimmed;
  • Regularly apply lotion to the feet.

Toenails that are not trimmed properly for seniors is also important because it can result in an ingrown toenail or an infection. And when trimming the toenails, do it in a well-lit area after your loved one has taken a shower or bath making it easier to cut their nails.

Lastly, disregarding foot pain in the elderly can be an indication of a more serious condition. If your loved one is suffering from foot pain, take them to their podiatrist as soon as possible.

Having healthy feet is a crucial component to enjoying a good quality of life as one ages. Keeping your feet – or those of your loved ones – isn’t difficult. It just takes a little planning and maintenance.

For more tips on how to care for elderly feet, call Dr. Hubert Lee of CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists today at (425) 455-0936 to schedule a consultation.  To schedule your appointment online, click here.