Nervous About Your Neuromas?

If you’re experiencing foot pain, you may be wondering what could be causing it. Many conditions affect the feet, and one such condition is known as a neuroma. Today, Dr. Hubert Lee of CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists is sharing information to relieve your anxiety.

A neuroma is a disorder of the nerves that can result in a great deal of pain. Sometimes referred to as a pinched nerve, it is actually a nerve growth or tumor many of which are benign (noncancerous).

What Are the Symptoms of a Neuroma?

The most common symptom of a neuroma is foot pain that is usually felt at the location of the neuroma, which is most often between the toes. These tumors can also cause tingling in the ball of the foot, a burning feeling, or even numbness in the foot.

Walking is often particularly painful for people who are suffering from a neuroma. At the first onset of pain, the person often assumes that they have a pebble in their shoe, as the growth can cause inflammation in the foot.

What Causes a Neuroma?

There is no one identified cause of a neuroma; however, there are some possible ones to consider. For instance, trauma to the nerve in the foot can cause inflammation and irregularities in the anatomy of the foot – such as flat feet or extra bones – can also cause a neuroma. They can also be the result of stress injuries from high-impact activities, many hours on your feet at work, or wearing poorly-fitting footwear.

Can a Neuroma Be Treated at Home?

If you suspect that you are suffering from a neuroma, you can try certain therapies at home to lessen your discomfort. Ice massages may reduce pain and swelling in the foot. Rub or massage ice on the ball of the foot and in between the toes for immediate relief.

Over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medicines can also diminish your discomfort. Orthotics can redistribute the pressure on your foot when you are walking or standing to put less pressure on the neuroma and reduce irritation and pain.

What Medical Treatments Are Available?

In addition to home remedies, a number of medical treatments can also help relieve the discomfort from a neuroma. For example, corticosteroid shots are used to decrease inflammation in the affected area and reduce pain.

There are two surgical procedures that can also provide relief from a neuroma. With the decompression technique, your podiatrist will take out the ligament that is applying pressure to the affected nerve. Another option is to remove the nerve entirely, but doctors typically leave this as a last resort because it can result in numbness that is permanent.

Now that you know these facts about neuromas, it’s time you receive the care you need to finally eliminate your foot pain. Call the office of Dr. Hubert Lee of CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists today at (425) 455-0936 to schedule a consultation so we can work together to relieve your pain and your anxiety!

Ingrown Toenails: What Runners Should Know!

Ingrown toenails are painful, and the throbbing and pressure they cause can make each step unbearable. Today, Dr. Hubert Lee of CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists is sharing information regarding ingrown toenails that all runners should be aware of.

Causes of Ingrown Toenails

Though they seem to appear out of nowhere, there are a few things that can trigger an ingrown toenail. One of the most common causes is shoes that are too tight on the toe, like high heels that force pressure on the front of your foot.

Running automatically elevates your risk. Any activity that puts repetitive pressure on the nail in the shoe, such as biking, running, or other sports, can put you at a higher risk for an ingrown nail.

Treatment for Ingrown Toenails

There are a few ways to try to relieve the symptoms at home. Soaking feet in warm water with Epsom salts and then gently massaging them may provide short-term relief from inflamed tissue.

You can also try repairing an ingrown toenail using a topical treatment. Over-the-counter, topical medications work to soften the nail or skin, and NSAIDs should provide pain relief.

A word of caution – don’t postpone getting your feet examined if your ingrown nail doesn’t appear to be improving after a few days of treating it on your own. If the issue is not improving, see your podiatrist for professional care. This is especially the case if there’s any drainage that looks like pus, if there’s redness to the toe, or if you experience fever, nausea, or chills.

Podiatrists agree that it’s not smart to play doctor and perform “surgery” on your ingrown toenail. Repetitive cutting and digging of the nail can worsen the ingrown toenail. If you have a chronic ingrown toenail, you may want to talk to your podiatrist about a procedure to permanently stop them from happening.

Preventing an Ingrown Toenail

The most important thing you can do to stop ingrown toenails from occurring is to wear shoes that fit properly with sufficient width in the toe box. Also, socks that don’t overly compress the toes can help.

Cutting your toenails correctly can also help reduce your risk of getting an ingrown nail. They are less likely to occur if your nails are cut straight across with no angles.

If you’re a runner, you know that proper foot health is key to your endurance. If you’re experiencing the symptoms of an ingrown toenail or any other condition that affects your feet – don’t hesitate – call the office of Dr. Hubert Lee of CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists today at (425) 455-0936 or schedule your appointment online.

 

Don’t Trust the Internet to Fix Your Running Injuries

Technology has impacted all areas of our lives. It has not only changed our social interactions – but it’s also altered how we access and view healthcare. Google’s doctors are available to anyone at any time to diagnose health conditions and offer treatment advice. Today, our podiatrist Dr. Hubert Lee of CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists discusses why you shouldn’t rely on the internet to treat your sports injuries.

Seek a Professional

The internet can be a valuable source of information. It’s important to understand what issues you can treat yourself and what necessitates a visit to your doctor.

A podiatrist who regularly treats athletes has the skill and first-hand knowledge to diagnose injuries more precisely, speed up healing and prevent the injuries from reoccurring. These doctors can prescribe a series of diagnostic tests, such as x-rays, MRIs, ultrasounds, and blood work to identify underlying problems.

Running Injuries

Swelling and pain in the lower leg can be tendinitis caused by overuse or shoes that don’t fit properly. Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in the leg can travel into the brain and lungs and be fatal if it remains untreated. Runners are particularly vulnerable to DVT’s following a race due to trauma, dehydration, and inactivity.

Pain in the front of the foot may be the result of nerve irritation or neuroma, but it could also be caused by a stress fracture or tendinitis that can be identified with an x-ray.

Female distance runners face more risk after the age of 35, especially if they over-train and don’t rest enough between races. Nerve pain in the foot may also look like neuropathy and an early sign of diabetes.

Many patients assume that heel pain is the result of plantar fasciitis, but the pain could be caused by nerve irritation, a bone cyst or stress fracture. Often it is the neighboring posterior tendon that is the culprit and requires a different treatment approach. Arthritic disorders such as gout can also cause heel pain.

In Closing

The internet should not be used as a substitute for an in-person assessment by your podiatrist. Rather than spending time reading medical advice on the internet.

If you have unresolved problems in your lower extremity, use your smartphone or computer to make an appointment, not to look for treatment advice. Call the office of Dr. Hubert Lee of CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists today at (425) 455-0936 or schedule your appointment online.