Summertime Foot Care for Active Diabetics

Seasonal changes bring possible medical problems for diabetics that can have an impact on blood circulation and skin health. Today Dr. Hubert Lee of CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists is sharing his summertime foot care tips for diabetics on the go.

When a diabetic’s skin gets dehydrated, cracking and splitting of their skin can uncover underlying dermal layers that contain capillaries. And broken capillaries provide easy access for the bacteria that cause infection, which can progress into wounds that are difficult to heal.

The following tips provide insight on enhanced foot care for diabetics that will help prepare you to actively participate in outdoor activities this summer.

Summertime Foot Care for Active Diabetics

Peripheral vascular disease is a common problem that affects many diabetics when their feet don’t receive enough oxygen due to diminished circulation. Diabetic foot ulcers may also appear on the soles of the feet.

As the integrity of the skin weakens under continuous pressure, an open sore may develop into an ulcer if not treated immediately. These ulcers tend to occur more frequently during summer due to sweating feet.

5 Tips to Keep Your Diabetic Feet Happy and Healthy

Together with a diabetic-friendly diet and drinking, plenty of water, the following foot care tips for diabetics will help maintain the health of your feet.

  1. Don’t wear improperly-fitting shoes or constricting socks that can block blood flow to the feet. Special diabetic shoes and socks help your feet remain healthy while participating in summertime activities.
  2. Wash your feet daily with warm water and mild soap, drying them thoroughly, especially between the toes. Dampness between the toes promotes fungal infections, skin ulcers, and open wounds.
  3. Trim toenails to prevent them from cutting your skin or turning into ingrown toenails. Cut them straight across – but not too short – and file with an emery board.
  4. Soak your feet in warm water, then remove corns or calluses with a pumice stone.
  5. Sprinkle talcum powder or cornstarch in your shoes and socks to remove excess moisture before engaging in physical activity.

Even the smallest wounds that affect the feet of diabetics require immediate treatment. If you want your diabetic feet to be the healthy and happy this summer, contact the office of Dr. Hubert Lee at CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists today at (425) 455-0936 to book an appointment or schedule an appointment online.

Smelly Feet? Here’s What You Can Do!

Your feet are a very important part of you; after all, without them, you couldn’t walk around, run a race, or even stand up. And sometimes, your feet work so hard for you that sometimes they get sweaty and smelly, in warm weather and in cold. Read on for tips from Dr. Hubert Lee of CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists regarding how to avoid smelly feet.

What Can You Do About Smelly Feet?

In most cases, there’s no need to worry about smelly feet. But if the stink really bothers you or someone else notices it, you may need help. While you might not be able to stop the smell completely, if you reduce the sweat, you’ll reduce the odor.

Here are some tips for reducing sweat on your feet.

Keep them clean. Instead of just washing your feet in the shower, wash them daily by dipping them into a tub of water and scrubbing them. Be sure to dry them thoroughly, especially between the toes to prevent athlete’s foot.

Wear the correct socks. Some wools, cotton, and special knits made specifically for athletes will allow your feet to breathe and absorb the sweat. Put on a fresh pair of socks every day, especially if they tend to get damp.

Avoid shoes that are too tight. Shoes that are too tight can cause your feet to sweat more than normal.

Change your shoes. Continually wearing the same shoes every day can make them smell more. Allow them to dry out for a few days before wearing them again.

Kill the germs. Consider using a disinfectant spray to kill bacteria inside your shoes and/or washing your feet with antibacterial soap. Putting your shoes outside in the sun also may help.

Wash insoles and/or shoes. Some shoes or insoles – particularly sneakers – are washable. Washing them is a great way to destroy odors and get cleaner-smelling shoes. Just be sure to dry them completely before you begin wearing them again.

Avoid shoes that are made of plastic. Some human-made materials and plastics don’t allow your feet to breathe properly.

Air them out. Let them breathe, particularly at night. But don’t go shoeless too often, especially when outdoors because certain bacteria will be attracted to your feet.

Don’t share towels or shoes with other people. Doing so can transfer smell-causing bacteria from other people’s feet to yours and nobody wants that!

If you’re still experiencing issues with sweaty, smelly feet and need relief, contact the office of Dr. Hubert Lee at CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists today at (425) 455-0936 to book an appointment or schedule an appointment online so we can discuss your treatment options.

Why Foot Care Is Essential for Seniors

The foot is a complex body part. The intricacy and the heavy-duty wear-and-tear they tolerate over the years places a lot of stress and strain on them over the years. Today, Dr. Hubert Lee of CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists is discussing the importance of proper foot care for seniors.

It shouldn’t come as a big surprise that many older adults experience problems with their feet. Here are some of the most common issues older adults experience with their feet.

Bunions. These are painful, bony lumps that grow on the outside of the big toe joint. They typically progress slowly over time, as the pressure on the big toe joint moves the toe inward, in the direction of the second toe. It is often made worse by wearing tight footwear or high heels.

Callouses and corns. These are thickened areas of dead skin that develop to protect sensitive areas and may occur in response to constant rubbing from an improperly-fitting pair of shoes or other type of irritation.

Hammertoes. Hammertoes point upward at the joint, instead of lying flat. They occur when one of the toe muscles weakens and pressure is put on the toe’s joints and tendons, forcing the toe to stick upward.

Physical changes. As we get older, the fat pads located on the bottom of our feet weaken, which can lead to pain with each step as well as diminished support for the arch. Pinched nerves and Achilles tendinitis can also develop as the foot matures.

Arthritis. The foot has 33 joints in total, so osteoarthritis can be the main source of pain and reduced mobility for seniors.

Heel pain. Pain at the back of the foot can be the result of heel spurs, which are bony lumps that grow along the heel bone, or of plantar fasciitis which is the inflammation of the ligament along the bottom of the foot.

Diabetes-related foot problems.  Diabetics experience a higher rate of cardiovascular problems that can result in serious foot problems that can eventually require amputation. For this reason, diabetics need to keep a close eye on their foot health.

Ingrown toenails, fungal infections, and other issues. An overgrowth of fungus, that may occur when the feet are frequently damp, can lead to unsightly and painful infections of the toenails and between the toes.

Older adults can still be healthy and active. Keeping their feet healthy will allow them to continue being as active as they want while living with less pain.

If you or someone you love is having any of these issues, contact the office of Dr. Hubert Lee at CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists to address your concerns. Call our office today at (425) 455-0936 to book your next visit or schedule an appointment online so we can discuss your treatment options.