8 Reasons to Take Proper Care of Your Feet

In life, every step counts. Your feet allow you to carry on with your daily activities. Caring for them can sometimes be challenging, but today Dr. Hubert Lee of CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists is sharing information regarding eight reasons why you should take proper care of your feet.

Being aware of how these health conditions can affect your feet will help you keep them healthy and happy.

  1. Diabetes. Diabetes can cause several different foot complications, including neuropathy (that can sometimes result in amputation) and poor circulation.
  2. Arthritis. Arthritis can present itself in several ways, but it’s usually painful, and it can be debilitating. When arthritis attacks your feet, there can eventually be a loss of mobility. It is crucial you visit a podiatrist if you experience the following symptoms:
  • Painful joints;
  • Swollen joints;
  • Difficulty moving a joint;
  • Redness on the joint;
  • Stiffness early in the day;
  • Changes in the skin.
  1. Injury. Ankle and foot injuries, including sprains, fractures, and strains, can cause a loss of support in your feet. Make an appointment with a podiatrist if you have pain or swelling in your feet or ankles or if you experience difficulty walking.
  1. Obesity. Research reveals that more than one-third of Americans are obese. This extra weight puts added pressure on ankles, hips, and knees, leading to more wear and tear on your feet.
  1. Tendon and Muscle Issues. Tendons, bones, and muscles, aid your feet in carrying your weight. If a muscle or tendon in your foot or ankle is injured, even the simple act of walking can become painful.
  2. Skin Disorders. The list of skin disorders are long, but certain skin conditions can result in significant health problems. See a podiatrist if the following skin issues develop:
  1. Toe Joint and Nerve Problems: Pain and numbness – when located in the joints of the toes – can cause a hammertoe, neuroma, or bunions.
  2. Toenail Issues. While they may seem like the least of your worries, toenail issues can cause significant discomfort from toenail fungus or ingrown toenails.

Keep your feet healthy by seeing a podiatrist if you experience any of these issues. Contact the office of Dr. Hubert Lee at CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists to schedule a consultation. Call our office today at (425) 455-0936 to book your visit or schedule an appointment online.

Diabetic Shoes: What’s So Special About Them?

It’s common knowledge that walking is very beneficial to our health. It’s also quite useful for controlling blood sugar levels. But it may come with the risk of injury for people who suffer from diabetes and neuropathy. Luckily, most of these foot injuries can be avoided by paying proper attention to foot care, and by investing in some diabetic shoes. Today Dr. Hubert Lee of CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists explains some reasons why you might want to consider diabetic shoes.

What Are The Special Features Of Diabetic Shoes?

These shoes are custom-designed and are intended to protect diabetic feet, while reducing the risk of skin breakdown, mainly in cases of poor circulation, foot deformities and neuropathy. Following are some of their very special features.

Non-Binding Uppers: The upper portion is soft with no overlays to eliminate pressure points.

Protecting Interior:  The inside of a diabetic shoe is constructed with soft material and no protruding stitching. In some cases, even the smallest bump can irritate and result in skin breakdown in diabetic feet.

Deeper Toe-Box: The tip of the diabetic shoe is higher, so it provides extra room for the toes.

Orthotic Support: Another one of the special features of diabetic shoes is special insoles that support the arch. This will reduce pressure on the bottom of the foot, and conform to the contours of the foot.

Stretchy Uppers: When extra protection is required, we recommend shoes with stretchy uppers. This will shape themselves to the contours of the deformed foot and help provide relief to pressure points.

Multiple Width Options: Diabetic shoes come in a range of widths to improve protection and fit.

Extra-Depth: Diabetic shoes are designed with extra depth to accommodate orthotics or diabetic insoles and provide a loose, pressure-free fit.

Functional Soles: Another special feature of diabetic shoes is the lightweight soles that are specially designed to aid mobility.

If you have diabetes and have any questions about our diabetic shoe program and how it can help you, contact the office of Dr. Hubert Lee at CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists today at (425) 455-0936 to book an appointment or schedule it online.

8 Ways That Aging Affects Your Feet

Aging affects your feet just as it does the rest of your body. When you consider the amount of stress we place on our feet throughout our lifetime, it’s easy to see why these issues develop. Today, Dr. Hubert Lee of CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists is sharing information regarding 8 effects that aging has on your feet.

Watch out for these aging issues that can occur with your feet!

  1. Dry Skin: Dry skin, particularly on the soles of the feet, is a problem that may necessitate the daily use of moisturizer to prevent cracking. The gradual reduction of collagen, worsened by the absence of proper foot care, can lead to cracked heels and calluses. When left untreated, the cracked skin around the heel can make it uncomfortable to walk or even stand.
  2. Seborrheic Keratosis: Another condition affecting older adults is called stucco keratosis due to its barnacle-like appearance. These raised lesions are often mistaken for warts and they usually affect the top of the toes, feet, and ankles. Although they are not painful, they can be itchy or cause irritation when wearing shoes.
  3. Flat Feet: As you and your feet age, ligaments can begin to stretch out, thereby lessening the height of your arch and leading to a condition referred to as flat feet. The pain tends to increase with activity and is often accompanied by inflammation along the arch and inner ankle. Flat feet can increase the risk of foot and ankle sprains.
  4. Shortened Achilles Tendon: Tendons connect bone to muscle, and if these are shortened due to water loss, you can end up flat-footed because you won’t be able to flex your toes, ankles, and midfoot as well. This is especially true of the Achilles tendon, which connects the calf muscle to the heel bone.
  5. Changes in the Toenails: Toenails typically become brittle and thicker as you age, making them more difficult to maintain. One reason for this is that nails grow slower when hormonal production is decreased.
  6. Hammertoe: Hammertoe is the irregular bend in the joint of one or more of your toes. It is typically the result of wearing high heels or narrow shoes that force the toes deeper into the toe box. They are prone to calluses and corns, and once they mature, they are essentially permanent unless surgery is utilized to realign the toe joints.
  7. Arthritis: Osteoarthritis (OA) also referred to as wear-and-tear arthritis, affects approximately 10 percent of men and 16 percent of women over the age of 60. Risk factors include hammertoe, bunions, obesity, or a previous foot or ankle injury.
  8. Circulation Problems: One of the most common foot and ankle symptoms in older people is inflammation, which is commonly connected with poor circulation, especially in the ankles and feet. Diabetes can also affect circulation, particularly as you get older. Diabetic neuropathy is an additional consequence of long-term diabetes.

If you or a loved one is having issues with the effects of aging feet, contact the office of Dr. Hubert Lee at CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists to schedule a consultation. Call our office today at (425) 455-0936 to book your visit or schedule an appointment online.