8 Ways That Aging Affects Your Feet

Aging affects your feet just as it does the rest of your body. When you consider the amount of stress we place on our feet throughout our lifetime, it’s easy to see why these issues develop. Today, Dr. Hubert Lee of CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists is sharing information regarding 8 effects that aging has on your feet.

Watch out for these aging issues that can occur with your feet!

  1. Dry Skin: Dry skin, particularly on the soles of the feet, is a problem that may necessitate the daily use of moisturizer to prevent cracking. The gradual reduction of collagen, worsened by the absence of proper foot care, can lead to cracked heels and calluses. When left untreated, the cracked skin around the heel can make it uncomfortable to walk or even stand.
  2. Seborrheic Keratosis: Another condition affecting older adults is called stucco keratosis due to its barnacle-like appearance. These raised lesions are often mistaken for warts and they usually affect the top of the toes, feet, and ankles. Although they are not painful, they can be itchy or cause irritation when wearing shoes.
  3. Flat Feet: As you and your feet age, ligaments can begin to stretch out, thereby lessening the height of your arch and leading to a condition referred to as flat feet. The pain tends to increase with activity and is often accompanied by inflammation along the arch and inner ankle. Flat feet can increase the risk of foot and ankle sprains.
  4. Shortened Achilles Tendon: Tendons connect bone to muscle, and if these are shortened due to water loss, you can end up flat-footed because you won’t be able to flex your toes, ankles, and midfoot as well. This is especially true of the Achilles tendon, which connects the calf muscle to the heel bone.
  5. Changes in the Toenails: Toenails typically become brittle and thicker as you age, making them more difficult to maintain. One reason for this is that nails grow slower when hormonal production is decreased.
  6. Hammertoe: Hammertoe is the irregular bend in the joint of one or more of your toes. It is typically the result of wearing high heels or narrow shoes that force the toes deeper into the toe box. They are prone to calluses and corns, and once they mature, they are essentially permanent unless surgery is utilized to realign the toe joints.
  7. Arthritis: Osteoarthritis (OA) also referred to as wear-and-tear arthritis, affects approximately 10 percent of men and 16 percent of women over the age of 60. Risk factors include hammertoe, bunions, obesity, or a previous foot or ankle injury.
  8. Circulation Problems: One of the most common foot and ankle symptoms in older people is inflammation, which is commonly connected with poor circulation, especially in the ankles and feet. Diabetes can also affect circulation, particularly as you get older. Diabetic neuropathy is an additional consequence of long-term diabetes.

If you or a loved one is having issues with the effects of aging feet, contact the office of Dr. Hubert Lee at CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists to schedule a consultation. Call our office today at (425) 455-0936 to book your visit or schedule an appointment online.

 

 

 

 

Are Your Feet Ready for Spring?

Keeping your feet healthy is fundamental to enjoying all that life has to offer. And by the time individuals reach the age of 50, they will have logged an astounding 75,000 miles on their feet. Today, Dr. Hubert Lee of CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists is sharing his tips for getting your feet healthy for spring and the warmer weather.

As you age, it becomes imperative that you find a podiatrist who can help you care for your feet properly, especially if you have bunions, diabetes, nail disorders, high blood pressure, cardiovascular problems, or undiagnosed pain.

The spring months are a popular time for people to think about their feet for the first time after a long winter in socks and boots. We all want our feet to look clean and well-maintained in sandals when the warmer weather hits.

Unfortunately, feet that are neglected can end up with a variety of disorders such as calluses, corns, ulcers, plantar warts, athlete’s foot, cracked heels, infections, fungal nails, ingrown nails, and dry skin, to name a few.

Here are some tips for getting your feet sandal-ready for spring.

  • Soak your feet. Soak your feet in a bath of warm water, a few drops of coconut oil and Epsom salts. This will soften the feet to make it easier to get rid of the dry skin.
  • Apply an intensive moisturizer to cracked heels and soles. Cracks in the feet can lead to infection if not remedied. But don’t use the moisturizer between your toes – that area should remain dry.
  • Smooth rough, troublesome corns and calluses. There are several ways to soften rough patches, including gels, files, electronic devices, and pumice stones. If you apply moisturizing cream and wear spa socks overnight, it can go a long way in softening the feet.
  • Reduce debris from keratin on the toenails. The nails can become unattractive after months of reduced airflow inside shoes and boots. Nails that are particularly thick, chalky, or yellow can be a sign of toenail fungus, which requires professional treatment.
  • Keep toenails trimmed. Trim toenails straight across and smooth the edges using a file so they can’t grow and cut into your skin. If you have trouble completing the task, ask your podiatrist to take over the job.

Don’t hide your feet this spring! By following these tips from our podiatrist, Dr. Hubert Lee of CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists, you and your feet can face spring fearlessly. If you notice a condition that needs expert help, call our office today at (425) 455-0936 to book your visit or schedule an appointment online.

Diabetic Feet: The Risks and How to Avoid Them

Statistics from the American Diabetes Association indicate that 24 million Americans suffer from diabetes. This disease is also the leading cause of amputations of feet, legs, and toes. Today, our podiatrist Dr. Hubert Lee of CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists outlines some of the risks associated with this disease and some tips for diabetic foot care.

Top 4 Risks for Patients With Diabetic Feet

As a person with diabetes, your feet face distinctive risks. Understanding them is the best way to avoid the common foot problems that come with this disease. Here are some of the most common foot health risks that people with diabetes have to cope with.

  1. Peripheral Arterial Disease: This disease reduces circulation and limits the amount of blood flow that reaches your feet, sometimes causing serious side effects.
  2. Infections: Blisters and abrasions are more dangerous for people with diabetes because blood flow to the feet is restricted so cuts cannot heal properly.
  3. Neuropathy: When your nerves do not function correctly, neuropathy occurs. This is particularly dangerous because if a patient cannot feel blisters or abrasions, they are at a higher risk of infection.
  4. Charcot Foot: This condition causes your foot to change its shape and is usually caused by fragile bones that break and collapse.

Daily Tips to Care For Your Diabetic Foot

With proper daily care, you can reduce the risk of having a foot ulcer or infection. Following are some tips to help maintain your healthy feet every day.

  • Make it a habit of inspecting your feet each day for cuts, sores or red spots.
  • Keep your feet clean and dry, paying particular attention to the area between your toes.
  • Wear socks around the house to keep your feet warm.
  • Exercise – it’s the best way to encourage blood flow to your feet.
  • Do not cut your toenails around the corners to avoid getting an ingrown toenail; instead, cut them straight across.
  • Improve blood circulation by quitting unhealthy habits such as smoking or sitting with your legs crossed for long periods.

If you notice any changes in your feet, it’s essential to visit your podiatrist right away to reduce the chance for infection or a more serious foot problem. Call the office of Dr. Hubert Lee of CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists today at (425) 455-0936 or schedule an appointment online.