Why Foot Pain Is More Common in the Winter

Have you ever wondered why your foot pain gets worse during the winter months?  Whether it’s common daily foot pain or lingering conditions that act up without warning, foot pain is very common in the winter.  Today Dr. Hubert Lee of CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists is sharing some reasons why.

Reasons Why Foot Pain Is So Common In The Winter

During the winter months, feet tend to hurt worse than during the previous warmer months for some of the following reasons.

Wearing unsupportive shoes

During the warmer weather months, we tend to wear sandals and flip-flops more than we probably should. Most flip-flops offer no support and put additional strain on the tendons and muscles with each step you take. Sandals that provide no arch support can tear, inflame, or overstretch your plantar fascia causing pain in the foot that worsens during the winter months.

Cold weather

While the cold weather may be making you shiver on the outside, it may also be wreaking havoc on the inside by causing achy muscles, bones, and joints. The colder temperature can contract the tissues in your joints, which can cause them to tug on the nerve endings, resulting in joint pain. It also tends to escalate foot conditions such as heel pain, plantar fasciitis, and arch pain.

Extra weight

Additional weight not only leads to obesity – it’s connected to an elevated risk of foot pain, which can lead to other problems such as plantar fasciitis. The added weight some of us gain during the holidays puts additional strain on arches, resulting in pain and discomfort during the winter months.

How to Overcome Winter Foot Pain

Here are some of the best tips to overcome winter foot pain.

  • Perform foot stretches daily.
  • Rest your feet as much as possible.
  • Don’t walk barefoot.
  • Wear custom orthotics.
  • Perform the RICE method, which is rice, ice, compression and elevation.

Remember, foot pain is not normal, regardless of the weather! If you feel that winter foot pain getting in the way of your daily activities, it’s time to visit your podiatrist. Contact the office Dr. Hubert Lee at CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists at (425) 455-0936 to book your visit or schedule an appointment online.

Is Your Foot Pain a Sign of Rheumatoid Arthritis?

May is Arthritis Awareness Month, and if you ask anyone living with Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), they will tell you that it’s a devastating diagnosis to receive because it is an incurable disease that can cause joint deformity and severe pain. Today, Dr. Hubert Lee of CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists is delving deeper into a painful condition.

The good news is that today the treatment options available are the most advanced they have ever been, and they are actually allowing many people with arthritis to live full and active lives.

Causes of Rheumatoid Arthritis in the Feet

With arthritis, the immune system assaults the body’s joint tissues, causing inflammation, which can result in gradual damage to affected joints. The immune system attacks the fluid within the joints as well as the joint lining, which then becomes acutely inflamed, causing a swollen and warm joint.

If left untreated, continued inflammation eventually causes bone and cartilage to erode, which leads to deformed joints and diminished range of motion. Additionally, the muscles, ligaments and tendons that surround and stabilize the joints may weaken.

Parts of the Foot Affected by Arthritis

When it comes to the feet, RA typically affects the toe joints, causing a gradual outward shift in the toes and bunions to develop. It may also cause the forefoot to shift, resulting in a loss of stability, which leads to conditions such as hammertoes.

These changes in toe-joint flexibility often cause calluses and pain under the ball of the foot and make finding comfortable shoes more difficult, resulting in the need for custom orthotics.

Other Foot Conditions Associated with Arthritis

Heel pain: This is a common problem for people with arthritis that can strike at the back of the heel resulting in plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendonitis, or bursitis.

Nerve entrapment: When the joint lining becomes inflamed, the swelling can cause symptoms of a pinched nerve, also referred to as nerve entrapment.

Rheumatoid nodules: This typically appears as a bump located beneath the skin, usually over a bony lump or tendon. It can grow over the Achilles tendon or on the side of the big toe if a bunion is present.

Skin rash: The inflammation associated with RA can cause wounds or rashes on the lower legs.

A close relationship with Dr. Hubert Lee at CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists – who will work to stop joint damage, alleviate pain and inflammation, and improve your sense of well-being – will ensure the best possible outcome throughout the course of your disease. Call our office today at (425) 455-0936 to book your next visit or schedule an appointment online so we can discuss your treatment options.

Running Through the Foot Pain Can Cause Permanent Damage!

One of the most challenging things for a runner to decide is when it’s acceptable to run through pain vs. when it’s time to ease up a bit. It’s very common for runners to feel various pains and aches due to sore muscles, so not every pain felt will be a substantial cause for concern. Today, Dr. Hubert Lee of CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists is sharing important information regarding the permanent damage that can result from running through your foot pain.

There are times when it’s necessary to pay attention to what your body is saying to avoid any long-term, or even permanent, damage. Pain appears in various forms, making it challenging to determine what is causing it.

So if pain can be misleading, is it okay to just keep running when you’re in significant foot pain? And if you do decide to keep going, does that put you at risk of permanent nerve damage?

The correct answer will depend upon where you’re experiencing the pain, and how severe it is. If you run often and are experiencing unexplained pain coursing through your foot, you may a nerve issue.

Injured Nerves

When a nerve is injured or irritated, it can cause weakness, loss of motor function, numbness, burning sensations, or shooting pain through your foot. If you have any of these symptoms, you should not continue to run, as this may exacerbate the injury, possibly causing more permanent damage.

In some cases, muscle inflammation from overuse can lead to nerve problems. This condition can have an effect on various areas of the foot and is often treated with cortisone injections.

Another condition known as neuroma affects the nerve located between the toes, making it difficult to put weight on the ball of the foot. Repetitive and excessive high-impact exercises can further irritate neuroma, and cortisone injections are also used to treat this condition.

A good rule of thumb to follow is that if something is so painful that it’s hard for you to walk on it, you should not be running on it. And while it may be tempting to just power through, it is always better to be safe than sorry when it comes to maintaining your good health.

If you’re experiencing pain when running, don’t take chances by powering through it. Contact the office of Dr. Hubert Lee at CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists to schedule a consultation. Call our office today at (425) 455-0936 to book your visit or schedule an appointment online.