It’s Time to Get Your Feet Ready For Fall

Fall has officially begun and now is the time to get your feet back into the fall-season shoes we love. Summer weather can be especially rough on the feet, especially for those who love playing and working in sandals, flip-flops or no shoes at all. For some, this behavior can leave the feet feeling and looking dry and cracked. Today, Dr. Hubert Lee of CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists is sharing some tips to get your feet back in shape and ready for fall.

Here are a few tips to get rid of the dry, cracked skin and get your feet ready for the fall season. 

  1. Give them a good rub down with lotion. A lot of dry skin can amass over the spring and summer months and massaging your feet with lotion will help moisturize them to get rid of that reptile look.
  2. Women should take a break from polishing their nails. Quite understandably, bare summer feet look attractive when they are well-groomed. But polishing your toenails too much can be unhealthy as it can cause the nails to deteriorate. You could also choose lighter shades of polish, but never pass up a good pedicure.
  3. Exfoliate your feet at least once a week with a foot file or pumice stone. When doing so, make sure you only address areas of dry skin as wet skin is more difficult to exfoliate. Cracks in the skin typically open wider when water weakens the skin tissue.
  4. There is nothing as soothing as a foot bath and warm foot soak. Soaking your feet not only helps to reduce stress – it might even help you feel and look younger over time. A foot massage offers the same wonderful effect.

One of the most important things you can do following your foot care routine is to choose the right fall boots or shoes. Women should not forget that their shoes do not have to be flats – a thicker heel can also work well. Just remember that support matters.

If you’re experiencing any issues with your feet, contact the office of Dr. Hubert Lee at CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists to schedule a consultation. Call our office today at (425) 455-0936 to book your visit or schedule an appointment online.

It’s Fungal Disease Awareness Week: Common Infections of the Foot

No matter how clean you keep your feet, they are constantly in contact with microorganisms that can cause infection. Bacteria and fungus are the most common offenders. Because this is Fungal disease Awareness Week, Dr. Hubert Lee of CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists is sharing information regarding the most common foot infections.

Fungal Foot Infections: These are familiar to many of us who may have picked up a toenail or foot infection in a spa or locker room. The foot, particularly between the toes, provides the perfect environment for infection. All it takes for the infection to develop is for the foot to come in contact with a contaminated surface.

Athlete’s Foot: When itchiness, flaking, and a rash develops between the toes, it is most often related to a common condition known as athlete’s foot. The fungus thrives in moist, warm environments such as saunas and gyms and can flourish in sweaty shoes and socks. It is very contagious and can be easily spread through contaminated towels, clothing, or floors.

Toenail Fungus: This fungal infection typically slowly grows underneath the toenail. Its symptoms include a yellowish or white discoloration, and the flaking and thickening of the nail, which separates from the nail bed. It often accompanies athlete’s foot and is more common in people with a weakened immune system.

Bacterial Foot Infections: While somewhat less common than a fungal infection, a bacterial foot infection can sometimes become serious, and develop from a local infection to a systemic one. Most are established through abrasions or breaks in the skin, often as a result of a penetrating wound.

Foot Abscess: Bacterial foot infections sometimes consolidate into a pocket of pus known as an abscess. This is most often caused by a puncture wound or the infection of a hair follicle.

Cellulitis: This is a potentially serious skin condition in which a local bacterial infection spreads from the site of the initial wound. It typically starts as a small area of inflammation that quickly spreads to surrounding tissues.

If you’re dealing with one of these or any other foot issues, contact the office of Dr. Hubert Lee at CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists to schedule a consultation. Call our office today at (425) 455-0936 to book your visit or schedule an appointment online.

What You Need to Know About Aging Feet

Our feet will carry us around 110,000 miles throughout our life – that’s over 216,000 steps! It’s certainly no wonder that as we age, our feet begin to experience challenges. Because September is Healthy Aging Month, today Dr. Hubert Lee of CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists is sharing information regarding what you need to know about your feet as you age.

Examples of the most common foot issues for the elderly include the following: 

Arthritis: Osteoarthritis can affect various joints, and the feet are no exception. Women are more at risk for the condition as they age.

Additional risk factors include:

  • Past injury to the ankle or foot;
  • Obesity;
  • Bunions;

Gout: This condition is an autoimmune disease that can cause excruciating pain and discomfort due to amassed acid crystals surrounding a joint, most often in the big toe.

Dry Skin: When left untreated, dry skin on the feet can cause discomfort when walking and allow bacteria to form, raising the possibility of an infection. Moisturizing your feet regularly before the skin becomes cracked often helps.

Flat Feet: Flat feet produces swelling and pain within the inner ankle and the arch of the foot. In some cases, it also causes these symptoms, upward through the lower back, knee, and hip. It can cause a senior to have stability and balance issues and increase the possibility of sprains in the ankles and feet.

Toenail Changes: As we age, toenails often get thicker and become more brittle, making them more difficult to clip. They also often develop ridges and cracks and change in color.

Condensed Achilles Tendon: The Achilles tendon can lose water in the aging process, which can shorten them and make them more susceptible to tears or ruptures, substantially less flexible, and create a flat-footed gait.

Make the first step to improving the foot health of your senior loved one! Contact the office of Dr. Hubert Lee at CarePlus Foot & Ankle Specialists to schedule a consultation. Call our office today at (425) 455-0936 to book your visit or schedule an appointment online.